Provisional wins: Abstracts, bursaries, and conferences

2015.03.17.yayI received an email today that gave me a bit of a confidence boost, so I thought it was time I (finally!) share a couple of happy PhD accomplishments. I should have shared some of this earlier, but I was feeling very unsure of myself and I was worried about sharing good news too soon. But I’m ready now. (Even though I’m still bracing for the bad news.)

So, here goes!

John Campbell Trust Bursary
The first bit of news is that I applied for a grant to the John Campbell Trust in November 2014 to allow me to travel to the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIST) in St Louis, MO, in November 2015. I received notification of my acceptance just before Christmas, but I wasn’t confident enough to share the news. After all, attendance at the conference also hinges on the acceptance of my abstract.

Over the next few weeks, I will be giving thought to my abstract for the conference. It will be based on a poster that will discuss early findings from my empirical work (possibly my pilot study). That means that I need to start making some solid headway into the design of my study!

If my abstract is accepted, I will plan to attend the conference in the autumn. After the conference, I hope to travel to Washington State to meet with a couple researchers from the University of Washington’s iSchool.

Assuming all of this happens, my parents are thinking that they will “meet me in St Louis” and we’ll all drive back to the great Pacific Northwest together. (And once the academic stuff is out of the way, I’ll stick around for Thanksgiving with my family.)

Information: Interactions and impact (i3) Conference
The second bit of news is that I submitted my first-ever paper abstract in January for the Information: Interactions and impact (i3) conference at Robert Gordon University in Aberdeen*. The abstract was based on a literature review looking at the role of online information in the determination and management of personal reputations. I admit that it was a bit of a challenge to write because I needed to find a balance between summarising the literature review and selling the idea, but I managed. Mostly.

And that brings me to the third bit of news, which is that my abstract has been provisionally accepted for presentation at the conference!

When the email came in this morning, I was afraid to open it because I was sure it would be a straight knock-back. But instead, I was asked to make some revisions to the abstract. After that, my acceptance will be re-evaluated.

I know that doesn’t mean I’m a shoo-in, but I really was pleased to learn that I wasn’t rejected flat-out. Plus, even if I don’t end up getting accepted, I am being given an additional chance to improve my academic communications skills.

Hopefully, it won’t be long before I’m telling you that my re-submitted i3 abstract is accepted. So stay tuned for that. (And feel free to send positive thoughts and such my way, too!)

It’s a little frustrating because these wins are all still provisional, but they’re positive things so it’s worth shouting about them a bit. After all, I’ve not been told I’m rubbish, so that might mean that I’m actually not too bad. (Yeah, I must work on this low self esteem a bit more.)

* That’s Aberdeen, Scotland, not the Aberdeen in my home state of Washington. Just in case anyone thought I’d be home for a visit this summer. Sorry; I won’t be. (But I hope to be there for Thanksgiving!)

Finding money

2014.02.18.finding-moneyI think that one of the hardest things about doing a PhD might be finding money. For my own studies, I know that I would have been unable to proceed without a studentship or other large funding source—which makes me very grateful to have been offered more than one studentship when I was seeking a place to study. (Sadly, I’ve heard many stories from people who’ve been unable to do a PhD because they weren’t so lucky.)

Whilst some people awarded studentships no longer need to find additional forms of finance for their studies, as they’re offered a tuition waiver as well as a small living stipend, that’s not the case for every student in recipient of a studentship.

For example, I am on a studentship but as an international student, I have to pay the difference between domestic and international tuition out of pocket. (Which is a lot of money for someone like me!) And that means I will spend my years as a PhD student applying for scholarships to help cover the gaps.*

Yesterday, I applied for my first scholarship of my PhD career** and I am now trying to find others that I may qualify for. I’ve decided that I will apply for as many scholarships and grants as I can get with the idea that finding “too much” money one year can help off-set a lack of money for another—but I have to remember that I am only one of many applying for the same pots of funding.

I have a list of scholarships that I will be applying for when they open up for the 2014/15 academic year and I am constantly on the look-out for more. But I’m also realising that I need to start looking at travel grants and conference scholarships so that I can further my training and knowledge by attending academic events throughout the UK, Europe, and even the world.

I am not stressed out about money (right now) but I realise that many PhD students (and students in general) spend a lot of time worrying about their finances and I imagine it makes a big impact on the amount of time they spend worrying about their studies.

So, what is this post about? I guess it’s a bit of an introduction to one of the general topics I’ll likely be covering throughout my studies: Finances!

Yes, part of Just a PhD will be devoted to talking about how I am working to add to my PhD budget—as well as how I plan to stretch the limited funds I have now. Those things will include scholarship applications, paid opportunities through the university (if there are any), and my own frugality which I’ve been perfecting since my teen-aged years.

And if you know of any great scholarships I should be applying for, please do give a shout! Every little penny counts and as soon as I have a bit more financial security, I can spend less time worrying about money and more time doing important things like PhDing!

* I have been blessed with a place to stay in a friend’s home until I can find funding, which means that I am not at risk of starvation or homelessness. Having a bit of stability helps! (As does having generous friends!)

** I applied for a few before I began my studies but have yet to be successful. I won’t give up though!